Airy Persiflage

The audio channel to long standing blog the Third Point of Singularity


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27
Jul
Posted in spoken word, Weird Fiction, Humor by misternizz at 11:59 pm

An unintended Frank Key double header tonight.. as Frank commented on Facebook that he would like to hear me recite THE CRUEL SEA, which is a long string of tortured adjectives from the Hooting Yard website.  Without further, ado, we present:

TheCruelSea-Key.jpg

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27
Jul

We've been missing the work of Mr. Frank Key here at Airy Persiflage, and the arrival of a recent Hooting Yard podcast suggested the perfect piece to perform with Young Gar.  With Mr. Key's kind permission, we present a dialogue between Signor Ploppo, a man of parts, and Ambrose, a cunning and curd-hungry member of the avian family.

AmbroseandPloppo.jpg

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professorpanini.jpg

In this humorous (and cautionary) tale, Matthew Grigg spins a story of a man, a duck, a cat and a toaster, and what this all has to do with Buttered Bagels.   Enjoy

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31
May

1SecAway-Logo.png

In One Second Away, the protagonist wrestles with the ethical dimensions of time travel and redemption, and arrives at a surprising, paradoxical conclusion.  Written by John L. French, read by Walter O'Hara

"One Second Away" first appeared in Startling Stories Winter 2010, published by Wildcat Books. Their website is http://www.wildcatbooks.net/.  John L. French is a crime scene supervisor with the Baltimore Police Department Crime Laboratory. As a writer of crime, pulp and horror fiction his stories have appeared in Hardboiled, Alfred Hitchcock’s Mystery Magazine, THE DEAD WALK, FLESH AND IRON and other anthologies. He was the consulting editor for Chelsea House’s CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS series for young adults. His latest book is HERE THERE BE MONSTERS, A Bianca Jones Collection. He is the editor of BAD COP, NO DONUT, Tales of Police Behaving Badly. All of John's books are available on Amazon.com or direct from him (signed/inscribed copies) by emailing him at jfrenchfam@aol.com

illustration by Walter O'Hara

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How the Old World Died by Harry Harrison

A self-replicating machine is, as the name suggests, an artificial self-replicating system that relies on conventional large-scale technology and automation. Certain idiosyncratic terms are occasionally found in the literature. For example, the term "clanking replicator" was once used by Drexler[3] to distinguish macroscale replicating systems from the microscopic nanorobots or "assemblers" that nanotechnology may make possible, but the term is informal and is rarely used by others in popular or technical discussions. Replicators have also been called "von Neumann machines" after mathemetician John von Neumann, who first rigorously studied the idea.

In this short story, Harry Harrison depicts a future in a world transformed by Von Neumann machines.

Story: Harry Harrison published as This is how the world ended – and this is what will happen next! in the October 1964 issue of Galaxy Science Fiction.

Read by: Walter O'Hara

Illustration: Walter O'Hara

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22
May

John Adams (1735-1826) and Abigail Smith Adams (1744-1818) were a couple that supported each other intellectually and emotionally throughout their long married life together.  Throughout John's long absences, first with the Continental Congress and then as ambassador to France and the Netherlands, they kept up an astonishing correspondence exchanging over 1,100 letters, beginning during their courtship in 1762 and continuing throughout John's political career (until 1801). These warm and informative letters include John's descriptions of the Continental Congress and his impressions of Europe while he served in various diplomatic roles, as well as Abigail's updates about their family, farm, and news of the Revolution's impact on the Boston area.

Some of this correspondence is archived and published here at the Massachusetts Historical Society website.  We will attempt to do this subject some justice.  Thanks to Julie Bellam of Pennsylvania for reading Abigal's letter.

In this letter, Abigal tells John about an excursion on a continental brig, and John mentions an upcoming Declaration that will become a major focus of his life.

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5
May

Another visit with our favorite hard living surrealist from across the Atlantic, Mr. Frank Key. this is from his work IMPUGNED BY A PEASANT, and can be found for sale on the Hooting Yard website.  As you can see from the number of times we have read Mr. Key's work, it's obvious we hold his literary output in high regard.

In this seemingly random diatribe, the Regime tunes in to give us some excellent tips on how to deal with the embarrassment of hoof-prints on your ceiling.

Hoofprints

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23
Apr

By George Carlin Read by Walter O'Hara

This is my rendition of the late, great George Carlin's excellent rant on the Modern Age, "I'm a Modern Man"Words viewable here, if you're on Facebook.

I can't do it justice, but I love the piece, so I'll give it a shot.  The backgroun music is once again the excellent Anne Farnsworth, "Coolage", available under a Creative Commons license.  Enjoy

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5
Apr
Posted in poetry by misternizz at 10:55 pm

Contained herein, three short American poems.

  1. Drunken Memories of Anne Sexton, by Alan Dugan.
  2. Her Kind, by Anne Sexton.
  3. After Making Love, We Hear Footsteps, by Galway Kinnell.

The connection between the three is evident in the first one.  Thanks to my fellow reader, Julie Bellam of Buckhorn, Pennsylvania for "Her Kind".

The background music is Evanessence, by Anne Farnsworth, used with Creative Commons license.

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27
Mar
Posted in Sardonic Words, Classic by misternizz at 10:51 pm

The War Prayer is my favorite shorter fiction piece by Mr. Mark Twain, aka Samuel Clemens, distinguished man of letters and literary giant of the 19th century.  The War Prayer was written quite late in his life, circa 1905.  The piece was written in protest of the American-Phillipine War, which Twain opposed, and did not see print in his lifetime.  Biting and caustic, The War Prayer is as powerful today as it was when it was written.  I hope I have done justice to it here.

Mark Twain

Music by John Phillip Sousa and his band, from original Edison wax cylinders. Performed the year the piece was written.

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